CWP- Environmental Issues

Lesson Plans – High School

2 | Environmental Issues

The Boldt Decision

Contemporary World History Curriculum
OSPI Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum for the Social Studies

Historical Era

The Present: Nation-Building

 

Social Studies GLEs:

Grade 9: 3.2.2, 4.1.2, 4.2.1, 4.2.2

Grade 10: 3.2.2, 4.1.2, 4.2.1, 4.2.2

Grade 11: 1.1.1, 1.1.2, 3.1.1, 3.2.2, 4.2.1, 4.2.2

Grade 12: 1.1.2, 3.1.1, 3.2.2, 4.2.1, 4.2.2

Corresponding CBA:

Constitutional Issues

Essential Questions:

3,4,5


Asset List

Multimedia

Multimedia

Video Content

Corresponding Chapters from the Regional Learning Project’s Required Curriculum Materials:

Ch. 1 and 3

DVD: Contemporary Voices Along the Lewis and Clark Trail

Study Guide

DVD Chapter List

The DVD (28 minutes running time) is divided into five chapters that range from 3 to 10

minutes each, as follows:

Chapter 1: Introduction (9:10 minutes)

Chapter 2: Early Contact and its Consequences (3:00 min)

Chapter 3: Language (3:45 min)

Chapter 4: Respect (7:00 min)

Chapter 5: Continuity (5:00 min)

Ch. 1, 5 – 9 (depending on tribal location)

DVD: Native Homelands Along The Lewis and Clark Trail

Study Guide

DVD Chapter List

The DVD (35 minutes) is divided into nine chapters that range from 2 to 8 minutes each, as follows:

• Chapter 1: Introduction (2:00 minutes)

• Chapter 2: Homelands of the Mandan-Hidatsa (4:10 min)

• Chapter 3: Homeland of the Blackfeet (3:05 min)

• Chapter 4: Homeland of the Shoshone (3:05 min)

• Chapter 5: Homeland of the Salish (3:10 min)

• Chapter 6: Homelands of the Sahaptin-speaking Tribes of the Columbia River (8:10 min)

• Chapter 7: Homelands of the Upper Chinookan Tribes (3:30 min)

• Chapter 8: Homelands of the Lower Chinookan Tribes (5:00 min)

• Chapter 9: Close (0:45 min)

Handouts/Documents
Student Examples/projects
Lesson Overview

Level 1

By the end of instruction, students will:

  • Recognizes the civil litigation efforts of tribal conservation &/or reclamation of natural resources (tribal sovereignty objectives 1 & 2)
  • Evaluate how Indian and non-Indian interaction with the environment has affected economic growth and sustainability (GLE 3.2.1, grade 12)

Level 2

By the end of instruction, students will:

  • Recognizes the civil litigation efforts of tribal conservation &/or reclamation of natural resources (tribal sovereignty objectives 1 & 2)
  • Evaluate how Indian and non-Indian interaction with the environment has affected economic growth and sustainability (GLE 3.2.1, grade 12)
  • Students read the “Timeline of Tribal Fishing Rights” hand-out
  • Students complete the exercises in the margins of the timeline.

Level 3

By the end of instruction, students will:

  • Recognizes the civil litigation efforts of tribal conservation &/or reclamation of natural resources (tribal sovereignty objectives 1 & 2)
  • Evaluate how Indian and non-Indian interaction with the environment has affected economic growth and sustainability (GLE 3.2.1, grade 12)
Level 1

Level 1:           Indian people lived in the Pacific Northwest for thousands of years, with salmon as a foundation for their culture, economy, and religion.  There are many dates, names, and places that were important in establishing current tribal fishing rights.  Students will define terms related to tribal fishing rights and interpret legal terms associated with Indian case law.

Day 1

Introduce timeline of tribal fishing rights.

 Looking Ahead to Level Two Curriculum:

If time allows, encourage students to identify and research which events specifically involve a local tribe’s fishing rights.

Level 2

Level 2:           Students will evaluate important events in tribal fishing rights, select ten events that seem most important, and construct a timeline.  They will make an accordion book to present their timelines.

Day 1

Students construct and present timelines with an accordion book.

  • Students select ten events that seem most important in establishing tribal fishing rights.

For students who need more structure, tell them to start with The Boldt Decision in 1974.

Highlighters may be helpful for some students in remembering their dates.

  • Students make an accordion book.
STEP 1 Start with 6 sheets of plain or colored paper.  Fold the paper into hamburgers.  
STEP 2 Cut the paper in half along the fold lines.
STEP 3 Fold each section of paper into hamburgers.  Leave one side longer than the other side to form a tab that is about one-half inch long.
STEP 4 Fold this tab forward over the shorter side.Then fold it the opposite way.  
STEP Glue the pages together using the tabs to make an accordion book.
  • Students choose an appropriate title to go on the cover of their book.
  • Students will need a ruler to create a line that goes across each page of the book.
  • Students use one page for each event.
  • Students identify and research at least one event that involves a local tribe.
  • Students create a more in-depth description of the event and include it in their accordion book timelines.

To avoid having students choose the same event you may want to assign a student or groups of students to research an event.  This will allow you to jigsaw the project.  You can have students use large construction sheets of paper to create a jumbo accordion book timeline filled with detailed descriptions of a local tribe’s conservation and/or reclamation efforts.

Integrating Technology

Allow students to create a PowerPoint slide to present their description of a local tribe’s historical preservation and/or reclamation effort.  The slide can then be printed and glued onto the accordion book or used for a whole class presentation.

Looking Ahead to Level Three Curriculum:

If time allows, encourage students to visit “Streamside Livin’ – We’re On the Go!!”, a web page created by the Thurston County Storm and Surface Water Program at:

http://www.co.thurston.wa.us/stormwater/streamteam/stream/onthego.htm

The website provides:

  • a good overview of salmon migration within a Washington County
  • describes efforts to protect fish passages by building fish ladders to culverts
  • has pictures of Creeks in the County and tells how many salmon travel the creek

Extension Activity:

The descriptions offered in the “Timeline of Tribal Fishing Rights” hand-out are very limited and by no means complete.  Encourage students to research events in more detail, add pictures to their timelines, and create more in-depth descriptions of events.

Level 3

Level 3:           Students will gather an artifact box filled with information, facts, photo evidence, and so on that an international environmental lawyer might use to defend indigenous water rights.

Note to Teacher:         Water rights are a source of contention between indigenous cultures and the governments of developing nations.  Some scholars argue that the tribal fishing and water rights struggles of the Indians in the Pacific Northwest and Plateau can serve as a model to other indigenous peoples worldwide.  In short, what the rest of the world’s indigenous peoples are experiencing in modern times, the tribes of Washington State have already gone through and the tribes continue to work towards the preservation, protection, and reclamation of tribal fishing and water rights.

Day 1

  • Introduce the artifact box using the handout “Artifact Box:  Defending Indigenous Water Rights”.
  • Have students work in cooperative groups; decide on each group member’s responsibility to the group task, and set a specific time for task completion.
  • Pass out boxes (re-usable see-through Tupperware is best; cardboard shoe boxes are fine;   an expandable folder can be substituted.)  I’ve noticed that telling students to put their hand-out “Artifact Box: Defending Indigenous Water Rights” on the box lid serves as a motivating activity and will help the group keep track of the directions for each task.
  • Make sure student understand part of their assessment will come from other groups.
  • Students work together to create/find at least 2 artifacts.
  • A good starting point for a web-search about culverts is:

http://www.nathpo.org/News/Legal/News-Legal_Issues33.html

Day 2

Students continue to work together to create/find at least 4 artifacts.

Day 3

  • Students continue to work together to create/find at least 2 artifacts.
  • Students can present their artifacts box using a “lazy man show and tell.”
    • Students sit in their group with their artifact box.
    • Pass out “Artifact Box: Defending Indigenous Water Rights, Jury of Peers Assessment” making sure to give each group of students enough sheets to evaluate the other groups’ artifact boxes.  Each group only needs to turn in one sheet for each of their evaluations.  For example, if there are four student groups, then each group will turn in three sheets at the end of the “lazy man show and tell”
    • Students pass the box clockwise to the next group
    • Set a time limit like eight minutes for each group to have time with the artifact box they’re evaluating.  At the end of the time limit, students must turn in their evaluation sheets and pass the box clockwise.  Keep repeating until the groups have their original artifact boxes.
    • A “lazy man show and tell” is an alternative to having a gallery of artifact boxes and encourages students to interact with the work of the other groups in a meaningful way.