CWP- Globalization and the Economy

Lesson Plans – High School

3 | CWP- Globalization and the Economy

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation and Its Effects

Contemporary World History Curriculum
OSPI Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum for the Social Studies

Historical Era

The Present: Nation-Building

Social Studies GLEs:

Grade 9: 2.4.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 4.2.3, 4.3.1, 4.4.1

Grade 10: 2.4.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 4.2.3, 4.3.1

Grade 11: 2.4.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 4.2.3, 4.3.1

Grade 12: 2.4.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 4.2.3, 4.3.1

Corresponding CBA:

Cultural Interactions

Essential Questions:

1,4,5


Asset List

Multimedia

Multimedia

Video Content

Corresponding Chapters from the Regional Learning Project’s Required Curriculum Materials:

Ch. 5

DVD: Contemporary Voices Along the Lewis and Clark Trail

Study Guide

DVD Chapter List

The DVD (28 minutes running time) is divided into five chapters that range from 3 to 10

minutes each, as follows:

Chapter 1: Introduction (9:10 minutes)

Chapter 2: Early Contact and its Consequences (3:00 min)

Chapter 3: Language (3:45 min)

Chapter 4: Respect (7:00 min)

Chapter 5: Continuity (5:00 min)

Corresponding Chapters from the Regional Learning Project’s Required Curriculum Materials:

Ch. 1, 5 – 9 (depending on tribal location)

DVD: Native Homelands Along The Lewis and Clark Trail

Study Guide

DVD Chapter List

The DVD (35 minutes) is divided into nine chapters that range from 2 to 8 minutes each, as follows:

• Chapter 1: Introduction (2:00 minutes)

• Chapter 2: Homelands of the Mandan-Hidatsa (4:10 min)

• Chapter 3: Homeland of the Blackfeet (3:05 min)

• Chapter 4: Homeland of the Shoshone (3:05 min)

• Chapter 5: Homeland of the Salish (3:10 min)

• Chapter 6: Homelands of the Sahaptin-speaking Tribes of the Columbia River (8:10 min)

• Chapter 7: Homelands of the Upper Chinookan Tribes (3:30 min)

• Chapter 8: Homelands of the Lower Chinookan Tribes (5:00 min)

• Chapter 9: Close (0:45 min)

Handouts/Documents
Student Examples/projects
Lesson Overview
  1. A.   Level 1: (Approx. 1, 50 minute class period)

By the end of instruction, students will:

  • Understand that tribal sovereignty enables tribes to protect their ways of life and the development of their nations (Objective 2)
  • Understand that tribal, state, and federal agencies often work together toward common goals (Objective 3)
  • Analyzes and evaluates how individuals affect and are affected by the distribution of resources and sustainability (GLE 2.4.1, grade 12)

 

 

  1. 1.   Students will read the article “The Hanford Nuclear Reservation and its Effects on Tribal Sovereignty”
  2. 2.   Students will complete comprehension and inference questions to prepare a discussions for class.
  3. 3.   OPTIONAL: Students complete a cross-word puzzle by answering questions about the article.
  4. B.   Level 2: (Approx. 3, 50 minute class period)

By the end of instruction, students will:

  • Understand that tribal sovereignty enables tribes to protect their ways of life and the development of their nations (Objective 2)
  • Understand that tribal, state, and federal agencies often work together toward common goals (Objective 3)
  • Analyzes and evaluates the social and political factors affecting cultural interactions (GLE 3.2.2, grade 12)

 

  1. 1.   Students will review the goals of the Manhattan Project.
  2. 2.   Students will identify the geographic features of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in past and present times.
  3. 3.   Students will research and compare primary documents announcing the construction of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.
  4. 4.   Students will synthesize the above information and document Native involvement and consultation.
  5. C.   Level 3: (Approx. 3, 50 minute class period in addition to Levels 1 & 2)

By the end of instruction, students will:

  • Understand that tribal sovereignty enables tribes to protect their ways of life and the development of their nations (Objective 2)
  • Understand that tribal, state, and federal agencies often work together toward common goals (Objective 3)
  • Analyzes the motives and interests behind an interpretation of a recent event (GLE 4.3.1, grade 12)

 

  1. 1.   Students will understand the identification of National Wildlife Refuges in America.
  2. 2.   Students will identify the motives and interests for Tribes in Washington to support the Hanford Wildlife Refuge.
  3. 3.   Students will identify the motives and interests for Non-Indians in Washington to support the Hanford Wildlife Refuge.
  4. 4.   Students will compare the motives and interests behind establishing the Hanford Wildlife Refuge and present a collage of The Hanford Wildlife Refuge detailing the change in land and resources since the Manhattan Project.

 

  • Examines how the diet of Washington’s Tribal people may contribute to various health conditions associated with Hanford contamination (GLE 2.4.1)  Examines the motives and interests behind establishing Hanford as a National Wildlife Refuge (GLE 4.3.1) (GLE 2.4.1, 3.1.2, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 4.2.3, 4.3.1 grade 12)
  • Corresponding CBAs: Technology Through the Ages and Humans and the Environment
Level 1

Level 1:       Student will read an article giving a brief overview of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation’s effect on tribal sovereignty and complete a crossword puzzle to demonstrate their understanding.

Day 1

  • Students read the article “The Hanford Nuclear Reservation and its Effects on Tribal Sovereignty” (Appendix 1.A)
  • In class, students will discuss the questions following the article.
  • HOMEWORK: Students will evaluate the perspectives of three stakeholders: tribes, downwinders (nontribal), and the government.  On their own paper, they will compare the information on the three sites’ perspectives on governmental responsibility to tribal people and other “downwinders.”  Students will draw conclusions regarding governments’ responsibilities to their environments and citizens. They will share their conclusion statements in class the following day.
  • Optional:  Student complete the crossword puzzle “Polluting Tribal Sovereignty.”
Level 2

Guiding Question:  What role did ethnocentrism play in determining the location of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the usual and accustomed lands of the plateau tribal peoples and communicating the subsequent pollution (GLE 3.2.2)

Level 2:       Students will work in cooperative groups to read several articles about the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.  After each group reads their article, students will focus on answering several general questions about each article as well as questions generated by the class.  Then students will become the “expert” for their article as they report out to newly formed groups about their article.

Resources for articles

http://www.tri-cityherald.com/901/story/762751.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1990/09/03/us/washington-nuclear-plant-poses-risk-for-indians.html

http://www.ratical.org/radiation/WorldUraniumHearing/RusselJim.html

https://engineering.purdue.edu/ChE/AboutUs/News/ProfAlbrightsmemoiroftheManhattanProject

Day 1

  • Before class starts, write the names of all the articles on the board.
    • “Picture of Manhattan Project life unearthed at Hanford”
    • “Washington Nuclear Plant Poses Risk for Indians”
    • “Testimony: Russell Jim, World Uranium Hearings, 9/17/92, Salzburg”
    • “Prof. Albright’s memoir of the Manhattan Project”
    • Have students work in cooperative groups.
    • Direct students to read the titles of the articles on the board.  Have each group of students brainstorm what each article might be about.  To share the groups’ thoughts invite a group member to write their group’s ideas on the board or simply ask for the group member to stand and share what their group discussed.
    • Have each group pick an article to read, but do not pass-out the articles yet.
    • Assign each group to write four – six questions for another group about the other group’s article based off the title alone.
    • Pass out the articles, any teacher-generated general questions, and the student generated questions to each group.
    • Give the groups time to read and answer the questions.

Day 2

  • Have students work in their groups to prepare a statement about their article that incorporates both the general and student-generated questions about their article.
  • Separate the groups.
  • Ask each student to generate a question that they believe everybody should be able to answer after they share their group’s statement.  Have students write a potential correct answer for their question. Collect the questions and tell the students there will be a quiz after groups share their statements which will include these questions.
  • Assign each student to a new group such that each group has at least one member from the first groups.
  • Each student will take turns being the “expert” in the group by sharing their statement.
  • As students listen, they will complete a graphic organizer “The Hanford Nuclear Reservation and its Effects”

Day 3

  • Before class add student-generated questions to a quiz and print-out.
  • Have students return to their original groups to review and compare their graphic organizers.
  • Distribute the quiz.
  • After the quiz is collected, discuss it as a class if time allows.
Level 3

Level 3:       Students will investigate the motives and interests for Tribes and non-Indians in Washington to support the Hanford Wildlife Refuge and evaluate the government-to-government relationship that propelled the effort.

Day 1

1)      Students will understand the identification of National Wildlife Refuges in America.

  • Visit the National Wildlife Refuge website:  http://www.fws.gov/Refuges/
  • Answer questions #1-3 on “Hanford Wildlife Refuge” worksheet(Appendix 3)

2)      Students will identify the motives and interests for Tribes in Washington to support the Hanford Wildlife Refuge.

3)      Students will identify the motives and interests for Non-Indians in Washington to support the Hanford Wildlife Refuge.

4)      Students will compare the motives and interests behind establishing the Hanford Wildlife Refuge

  • Create a collage to raise awareness of The Hanford Wildlife Refuge
  • Find creative ways to include tribal and non-tribal reasons for protecting the area in your collage.
  • Be sure to include words or pictures on your collage that document the change in land and resources since the Manhattan Project.

Resources

Hanford:  http://www.hanford.gov/?page=581&parent=0