WA – Contemporary Washington State

Lesson Plans – Middle School

3 | WA -  Contemporary Washington State

Indian Land Tenure (Boldt II)

WA History Curriculum
OSPI Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum for the Social Studies

Historical Era

1854 – 1889 The Treaty Era | 1889 – 1930 Removal and Assimilation | 1930 – 1945 Assimilation to Termination |1945 – 1980 Self-Determination | 1980 – Present Nation-Building 

Social Studies GLEs:

Grade 6: 1.3.1, 1.4.1, 2.1.1, 2.2.2, 2.3.1, 3.2.1, 4.2.3

Grade 7: 1.3.1, 1.4.1, 2.1.1, 2.2.2, 2.3.1, 3.1.2. 4.2.3

Grade 8: 1.3.1, 1.4.1, 2.1.1, 2.2.2, 2.3.1, 3.1.2, 4.2.3

Essential Questions:

5


Asset List

Multimedia

Multimedia

Video Content

Corresponding Chapters from the Regional Learning Project:

N/A

Handouts/Documents
Student Examples/projects

Lesson Overview

Lesson 1 Overview

In this Level One activity, students will read a newspaper article on the impact of the Boldt decisions. Students will then engage in small group discussions about what they have learned.

Lesson 2 Overview

In this Level Two activity, students will use the Indian Land Tenure Curriculum to research how contemporary Northwest Tribes work to conserve fisheries, specifically salmon, in the Pacific Northwest. Students will then propose other conservation possibilities and explain how to implement them.

Lesson 3 Overview

Students will use their research from Level Two to implement one of two recommended CBA’s: “Causes of Conflict,” or “Humans and the Environment”

Level 1

1980 – Present Nation-Building: Level One Activity
GLE’s Covered: History 4.1.2, 4.1.4; Civics 1.3.1; Economics 2.1.1

In level one students will:

  • Explore the ways that Boldt and Boldt II decisions have effected Tribes in the Pacific Northwest
  • Read the newspaper article: Boldt Decision “very much alive” – 30 years later
  • Engage in a classroom discussion about Boldt and Boldt II using “Guiding Questions” provided

Step One:
Teachers should make sure students have access to the newspaper article Boldt Decision “very much alive” – 30 years later either online or by making copies. This article clearly identifies the results of the Boldt and Boldt II decisions, and the ensuing challenges to implementing the reclamation of “usual and custom” fishing grounds for Native people in the Pacific Northwest.
Step Two:
Once students have completed reading the news article, divide the class into groups of three: A facilitator, a reporter, and a recorder. Students should read the following questions with the facilitator making sure conversation is respectful and on task. Recorders should write down the groups’s response to the questions, and the recorder should report out to the class on the group’s conclusions.
1. What important right did the Boldt decision uphold for Native fishermen?
2. How did sport fishermen view the decision?
3. How did tribes benefit from the decision?
4. What significant changes have occurred within tribes in the years since Boldt? Why did Tribes and commercial fishermen have to change their perspectives?
5. How is Boldt II different than the first Boldt decision – what does it aim to accomplish?
6. Why is is so important to Northwest Tribes to preserve Salmon?
Extension:
Many of you live in a community where Tribes depend on salmon for their social, spiritual, and economic livelihoods. This would be a wonderful opportunity to invite a member of your local Tribe to speak to your class about their what the effect the Boldt and Boldt II decisions had on their community. Contact your Tribe’s education director and see if there are tribal members willing to come and speak to your class, especially if they were alive prior to the Boldt decisions and can speak to the changes they may have witnessed.

Level 2

1980 – Present Nation-Building: Level Two Activity
GLE’s Covered: History 4.1.2, 4.1.4; Civics 1.3.1; Economics 2.1.1

In level two students will:
Explore the ways that Boldt and Boldt II decisions have effected Tribes in the Pacific Northwest
Review the newspaper article: Boldt Decision “very much alive” – 30 years later
Deepen their understanding by using the Indian Land Tenure curriculum to research how the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission and tribal groups conserve and protect Tribal and United States resources
Write a selected conservation group to request information on their work.
Brainstorm possible conservation projects they would like to see implemented through Tribal organizations and design a plan to implement them.
Step One:

  •     Teachers should review their class discussion of the newspaper article Boldt Decision “very much alive” – 30 years later.
  •     Remind students of the impact that Boldt and Boldt II had on Northwest Tribes.
  •     Review the importance of salmon as the spiritual, cultural,, and economic backbone of Pacific Northwest Tribes.
  •     Explain to students that they are now going to research specific ways that tribal organizations engage in conservation in order to preserve their ways of life.

Step Two:
Teachers should access the Indian Land Tenure curriculum in order to complete Level Two activities for this unit. The lesson you will be using is Standard Three – Lesson One: Contemporary American Indian Land Issues. Make sure you have read and are familiar with the lesson prior to implementing it in the classroom. The lesson gives students the opportunity to choose from a variety of Tribal conservation organizations; however, for the purposes of this activity it is recommended that students research the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission or other tribal organizations working specifically with salmon conservation. Many tribal conservation organizations can be found by using the accompanying links in this lesson plan.

Level 3

1980 – Present Nation-Building: Level Three Activity
GLE’s Covered: History 4.1.2, 4.1.4; Civics 1.3.1; Economics 2.1.1

In level two students will:

Explore the ways that Boldt and Boldt II decisions have effected Tribes in the Pacific Northwest
Review the newspaper article: Boldt Decision “very much alive” – 30 years later
Deepen their understanding by using the Indian Land Tenure curriculum to research how the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission and tribal groups conserve and protect Tribal and United States resources
Write a selected conservation group to request information on their work.
Brainstorm possible conservation projects they would like to see implemented through Tribal organizations and design a plan to implement them.
Use their findings from Level One and Level Two to complete either the “Whose Rules?” or “Causes of Conflict” CBA

Step One:

  • Teachers should review their class discussion of the newspaper article Boldt Decision “very much alive” – 30 years later.
  •  Remind students of the impact that Boldt and Boldt II had on Northwest Tribes.
  • Review the importance of salmon as the spiritual, cultural,, and economic backbone of Pacific Northwest Tribes.
  • Explain to students that they are now going to research specific ways that tribal organizations engage in conservation in order to preserve their ways of life.

Step Two:
Teachers should access the Indian Land Tenure curriculum in order to complete Level Two activities for this unit. The lesson you will be using is Standard Three – Lesson One: Contemporary American Indian Land Issues. Make sure you have read and are familiar with the lesson prior to implementing it in the classroom. The lesson gives students the opportunity to choose from a variety of Tribal conservation organizations; however, for the purposes of this activity it is recommended that students research the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission or other tribal organizations working specifically with salmon conservation. Many tribal conservation organizations can be found by using the accompanying links in this lesson plan.
Step Three:
While there is no recommended CBA for the Contemporary Washington State Unit, Levels One and Two are easily adapted to complete either the “Causes of Conflict?” or “Humans and the Environment” CBA’s. For example, a student could use the “Humans and the Environment” CBA to compare and contrast the roles of Sport Fishermen and Tribes in salmon preservation. Using the “Causes of Conflict” CBA, students could address the conflict between the US government, Tribes, and the State of Washington regarding implementation of Boldt and Boldt II in Washington State.