STI Videos

Video & Multimedia

Videos

The Regional Learning Project

The Regional Learning Project (2001-2010) collaborated with tribal educators to produce top quality, primary resource materials about Native Americans, Montana, and regional history.

The results of this effort are a unique collection of educational resources focused on the history of Indian tribes within the larger context of regional history, geography and culture. The Native Voices DVD and Teacher Guide series includes a rich collection of primary resource documents gathered from archives, newspapers, and filmed interviews with tribal historians and educators. The highly visual and interactive nature of these materials will engage and motivate learners, while simultaneously providing multiple opportunities to strengthen their critical thinking skills. Content from this one-of-a-kind series offers a varied span of resources developed for students at elementary, middle, and high school levels. Designed to integrate and meet National and State content standards in Social Studies, Indian Education, Reading, Writing, and Critical Literacy, these resources can be easily and seamlessly incorporated into existing curricula.

Although the Regional Learning Project is no longer active, it’s founder and director, Dr. Sally Thompson, is still available for consultation about these resources at sally.thompson@umontana.edu.

© 2009 Regional Learning Project, The University of Montana, Center for Continuing Education.

Native Voices DVDs w/Teacher Guides

All the following DVD’s have been transferred to Adobe Presenter. The presentation will automatically start. In order to view the presentation you will need to have the latest version of Flash Player installed on your computer. Make sure that your speakers are turned on so that you can hear the professor speaking.

* In order to fully utilize the DVD series as an educational resource please see our quick user instructions below that will help you navigate the Adobe Presentations of the Native Voices DVD series.

Instructions & Study Guide

Native Voices DVDs w/Teacher Guides Series – User Instructions

All the following DVD’s have been transferred to Adobe Presenter. The presentation will automatically start. In order to view the presentation you will need to have the latest version of Flash Player installed on your computer. Make sure that your speakers are turned on so that you can hear the professor speaking.

Using the Playbar:
All Adobe Presenter presentations have a playbar that allows you to navigate through the PPT slides. You will be able to play, pause, go forward, go backward, adjust volume, access attachments, and adjust the layout of the presentation using the playbar . Refer tothe figure below for a description of which icon performs each one of these functions.

Presenter Control Bar

Adobe Presenter has two layout views. The full layout displaying the full playbar and full tab panel, and a streamlined layout displaying only a small control panel. The smaller control panel works well for smaller screens. To expand to the full layout and access the tabs click on the “Layout” located in the lower right hand corner of the small control panel.

Small Control Panel

Adobe Presenter allows for download of the Native Voices DVD supplemental matierals. Materials include Teacher Guide, Quicktime movie of each chapter, maps, activities and more

.Simply click on the “Paper Clip” icon within the presentation to access the file list.

Then select the item for download. Download should begin immediately.

Long Before We Were Born How Tribes Got Their Names:A Montana Example Native Homelands along
the Lewis & Clark trail
4th – 10th Grades
Talking Without Words in the
Old West
5th – 6th Grades
Tribal Perspectives
on American History in the Northwest
7th – 12th Grades
Tribal Perspectives
on American History in the Great Plains
7th – 12th Grades
Contemporary Voices
Along the Lewis & Clark Trail
High School
35-minute DVD, with 75-page teacher guide Suggested for 2nd – 3rd grades Exploring the concept of community by comparing the ways we meet our basic needs today with the ways different tribal groups met them long ago.  35-minute DVD, with 70 page teacher guide Suggested for 4th — 5th grades Exploring the origin of contemporary tribal names.  35-minute documentary film, with 80-page teacher guide Suggested for 4th – 10th grade Providing a unique and engaging perspective of American History.  20-minute DVD, with 59-page teacher guide Suggested for 5th – 6th grades Drawing from a wealth of historical resources, viewers learn about the challenges people face when communicating with people who speak another language.  75-minute DVD, with 103-page teacher guide Suggested for 7th – 12th grades Integrates the traditions, histories, and cultures of northwest indigenous people to the classroom in an engaging and thoughtful manner.  Region 115-minute DVD, with 127-page teacher guide Suggested for 7th — 12th grades Integrates the traditions, histories, and cultures of indigenous people in the Great Plains to the classroom in an engaging and thoughtful manner.  28-minute documentary film, with 70-page teacher guide Suggested for High School Providing essential lessons about Native people and their unique perspective of the Lewis & Clark expedition both past and present.

Celilo

1

“Celilo Falls, for thousands of years it was the cultural hub of the Pacific Northwest, drawing people from across the region to fish, feast, trade, and renew kinship… In 1957 Celilo Falls was swallowed by the rising backwater of the newly constructed Dalles Dam. A new era of hydropower had begun, displacing the traditional ways along the Columbia…” Produced and directed by Ian McCluskey & Steve Mital.

2

Desription of Celilo Falls 1915-1957

3

Description of “The Last Salmo0n Feast”. Oregon Historical Society

U.S. Fish & Wildlife

The Fish and Wildlife Service’s Midwest Region recently developed this video as a tool to help our employees better understand our trust responsibilities as a federal agency for working with Indian Tribes.

A unique relationship exists between Native American Tribes and the United States Government; and, this relationship has important implications for the Service and the work that we do.

“This video is the newest tool developed to help us all better understand what our responsibilities are, how this applies to the work we do, and how we can work together to meet our shared goals,” said Midwest Regional Director, Tom Melius. “Effectively working with Tribes is a priority for our Region and presents a tremendous conservation partnership opportunity”.

Many individuals, including many of our Tribal partners, Service employees, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and our regional Office of the Solicitor contributed to producing the video. We hope it will be a valuable resource not only for our employees but also for our Tribal partners and others who are interested in learning more about the Federal trust responsibility to Indian Tribes.

More information on our work with Tribes is available on our Partnerships with Native Americans website at: http://www.fws.gov/midwest/Tribal

Tribal Trust Part 1

Tribal Trust Part 2

Tribal Trust Part 3

Of Interest

On January 31st, Denny Hurtado, Director of Indian Education, at OSPI and Shana Brown, Seattle teacher and curriculum developer, presented information to UW teacher education students about “Since Time Immemorial: Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum.”

Video Hosted by: http://education.washington.edu/news/video/hurtado.html

 

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to call OSPI at (360) 725-6160 for assistance.